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peach107




Joined: 2007-08-18
Posts: 201
Location: prescott, arizona

PostPosted: Wed Aug 29, 2012 5:33 pm Reply with quote Back to top

3 EC's submitted. 3 EC's waiting in the wings. 3 EC's denied. 3 EC's scrapped before submittal. A year ago or so all 6 would have passed. I give up. Will probably never have another posted (or even try). Neither will most people at this rate. Adios ECs.
 
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Northwoods Tom
WGA Member



Joined: 2010-12-03
Posts: 632
Location: Washington Island

PostPosted: Wed Aug 29, 2012 6:15 pm Reply with quote Back to top

BUMMER!

Having done 8 of your earthcaches, I'm sad to read that. I'm sure anyone that has done any of your earthcaches will agree.
 
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Trekkin and Birdin
WGA Member



Joined: 2007-02-08
Posts: 5983
Location: West Salem WI

PostPosted: Wed Aug 29, 2012 7:02 pm Reply with quote Back to top

I second what Tom said. We haven't submitted one for a couple years now ourselves. Sorry to hear this.

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Trekkin' and Birdin'
Let's just go out and find caches and be done with it! 
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sandlanders
WGA Member



Joined: 2008-01-18
Posts: 19214
Location: Adams, WI

PostPosted: Wed Aug 29, 2012 7:25 pm Reply with quote Back to top

Some ECs are lame. Yours are super, Peach! Guess the trend is for P&Gs in ECs now, too.

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more posts than finds... 
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smashing ground
WGA Member



Joined: 2009-08-23
Posts: 245
Location: Madison,WI

PostPosted: Wed Aug 29, 2012 8:21 pm Reply with quote Back to top

The only one I have published got revoked because they stated "There needs to be a learning process" so all I did was just add (Why?) at the end of a question and they approved it.
 
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peach107




Joined: 2007-08-18
Posts: 201
Location: prescott, arizona

PostPosted: Wed Aug 29, 2012 8:58 pm Reply with quote Back to top

they talk site specific? #1. i give you coords to a marsh. in the write up i describe 6 types of marshes. Did you even know that there are 6 different types? You have to go to the marsh to see and tell me what type it is. this can't be done unless you are "at the site". site specific? #2. i give you coords to a lake. in the write up i describe 5 types of lakes. Did you even know that there are 5 different types? You have to go to the lake to see and tell me what type it is. this can't be done unless you are "at the site". site specific? And then they want in the listing......What is unique about this area? HMMMM. NOTHING!!! It's a freakin marsh. Exact same as the one down the road, the ones in Appleton........and the ones in eastern europe. Uniqueness? It is here...........at these coordinates...........and yours isn't. Now that's unique. Post the dam thing!!!
 
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peach107




Joined: 2007-08-18
Posts: 201
Location: prescott, arizona

PostPosted: Wed Aug 29, 2012 9:01 pm Reply with quote Back to top

good night
 
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Bassanio
WGA Member



Joined: 2009-06-08
Posts: 84
Location: New London, WI

PostPosted: Thu Aug 30, 2012 12:49 am Reply with quote Back to top

When you have veteran earthcache owners throwing their hands up in the air in frustration, you have a problem with your system. You have earthcache owners who have created good E/C's in the past and they are out finding new locations that would make more good earthcaches...and the only thing stopping them is that they don't want to deal with the bureacracy of the earthcache.org.

I have a location that I think would make for a decent E/C. The research I've done so far shows it to be a pretty unique geological feature around here. But I'm hesitant to start assembling facts and details simply because the process of getting an earthcache published seems daunting. I agree that an E/C should be held to a higher standard but there does come a point where the "guidelines" seem arbitrary. The hoops they make you jump through makes it seem like they'd rather NOT have earthcaches published. Strange.

Getting an earthcache listed shouldn't be like writing a Masters thesis, for goodness sakes! Yes, you CAN make your E/C so involved that it would take a masters degree in geology to complete it, but most earthcaches are about bringing people to a location and learning something scientific about it. I don't mind doing the work to create or complete an earthcache, except if the roadblocks thrown up are put there on a whim.

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Lostby7
WGA Member



Joined: 2005-06-07
Posts: 3190
Location: Lake country area, WI

PostPosted: Thu Aug 30, 2012 5:56 am Reply with quote Back to top

The process left me bitter some time ago....
 
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Northwoods Tom
WGA Member



Joined: 2010-12-03
Posts: 632
Location: Washington Island

PostPosted: Thu Aug 30, 2012 8:55 am Reply with quote Back to top

peach107 wrote:
they talk site specific? .....What is unique about this area? HMMMM. NOTHING!!! It's a freakin marsh. Exact same as the one down the road, the ones in Appleton........and the ones in eastern europe. Uniqueness? It is here...........at these coordinates...........and yours isn't. Now that's unique. Post the dam thing!!!


I apologize in advance for laughing out loud when I read your post, but its great! Having been a teacher for 30+ years, it becomes "I" think obvious what s happening here. Reviewer is overworked, unpaid and harried to respond to submissions.

What makes it unique? (You) "A wonderful example of one of the various types". Is the reviewer just not getting it or are they doing a poor job of explaining to you what additional educational facts they need?

Never having created a earthcache, I may be totally wrong, but I really enjoyed the post.
 
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Northwoods Tom
WGA Member



Joined: 2010-12-03
Posts: 632
Location: Washington Island

PostPosted: Thu Aug 30, 2012 9:03 am Reply with quote Back to top

Northwoods Tom wrote:

Having done 8 of your earthcaches, I'm sad to read that. I'm sure anyone that has done any of your earthcaches will agree.


I'm going to quote myself here with a correction. I should have said "read" instead of "done".

All you have to do is read my log from The Namur Drumlin, (GC3FDFJ) to know that it was an educational experience for me.
 
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beccaday
WGA Secretary
WGA Secretary



Joined: 2010-09-22
Posts: 3581
Location: Waukesha

PostPosted: Thu Aug 30, 2012 3:19 pm Reply with quote Back to top

I know what you mean, it is getting harder and harder to come up with EC's that will actually get published. It's been frustrating. I have one that I've been working on for about a year now that may never see the light of day. *sigh*

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Not all who wander are lost, some are geocaching.

Disclaimer: This post and the contents of any links or images attached is the opinion of this poster and not that of the WGA or its Board of Directors. 
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peach107




Joined: 2007-08-18
Posts: 201
Location: prescott, arizona

PostPosted: Thu Aug 30, 2012 3:28 pm Reply with quote Back to top

Lake Classifications:
Natural lakes in Wisconsin are frequently classified by the source of their water supply and outflow. Based on these factors different categories of lakes have been identified and are listed below.

Drainage lakes:
Drainage lakes have both an inlet and an outlet and the main water source is stream drainage. Most major rivers in Wisconsin have drainage lakes somewhere along their path of flow. Drainage lakes, which owe over half of their maximum depth because of dam construction, are considered to be artificial lakes.

Seepage lakes:
This type of lake does not contain an inlet or an outlet, and only occasionally overflows. These landlocked water body’s principal sources of water is from precipitation, runoff and groundwater from the immediate drainage area. Seepage lakes commonly reflect rainfall patterns and groundwater levels and may fluctuate seasonally. Seepage lakes are the most common type of lake found in Wisconsin.

Spring lakes:
These types of lakes have no inlet, although they do have a continually flowing outlet. Their primary water source is groundwater pumping into the bottom of the lake from the surface drainage area (spring). Spring lakes are the headwaters of many streams and are fairly common in northern Wisconsin.

Drained lakes:
Like spring lakes, these lakes have no inlet, but do have a flowing outlet. Drained lakes are not groundwater-fed, as is the case with spring lakes. Their primary water source is from precipitation and drainage from the surrounding land. Frequently, water levels within drained lakes fluctuate, depending on the water supply. Under severe conditions, there could be no outlet flow because of the low water supply. Drained lakes are the least common type of lake found within the state of Wisconsin.

Artificial Lakes:
Artificial lakes are man-made bodies of water generally referred to as impoundments. An impoundment is considered a drainage lake since it has an inlet, an outlet, and its principal water source comes from stream drainage. Approximately 13 percent of all lakes in Wisconsin fit this definition.

Other Factors:
Every lake has its own separate and distinct personality. This personality can be based on its size, depth, water clarity, configuration, types of plant and animal life present, chemical characteristics and other factors. Some of these factors are listed in greater detail below.

Lake water quality and species of fish present are significantly influenced by the type of lake that it is. For example, drainage lakes can support populations of fish, which are not necessarily the same as the type found in the connecting streams. Drainage lakes, particularly impoundments, usually have higher nutrient levels than seepage or spring lakes. In contrast, landlocked seepage lakes are not influenced by streams and consequently, could have less diverse fish populations. Seepage lakes also have a smaller drainage area, which may account for lower nutrient levels and thus, a less diverse plant population.

Certain lakes, especially those near acidic wetlands, such as bogs, can become tainted with tannin. Tannin is a chemical leached from decaying vegetation and leaf material, which settles into the lake and stains the water. These so called "tannin lakes" can range from a dark (coffee) to a light brown (tea) color.

Lakes can also be classified as soft or hard water lakes. Hard water lakes contain higher levels of dissolved minerals such as calcium, iron and magnesium as compared to the levels of soft water lakes. These minerals are entered into groundwater as it passes through the soil and bedrock. Therefore, most wells contain hard water. Most lakes have fairly soft water unless they are fed primarily by springs percolating up through the ground. Plant and wildlife populations will also differ with variations in water hardness.

is that enough info?
 
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peach107




Joined: 2007-08-18
Posts: 201
Location: prescott, arizona

PostPosted: Thu Aug 30, 2012 3:29 pm Reply with quote Back to top

or this?
Natural Marsh Communities:
Basically, the six community types described below are organized in a progression from drier to wetter.

Shallow Emergent Marsh:
These marsh types have mineral and/or shallow organic soils that are moist to saturated and only seasonally flooded. Abundant species found in these marshes include reed canary grass, bluejoint grass, rice cutgrass, bulrushes and Joe-pye weed.

Sedge Meadow Marsh:
These types of open wetlands are permanently saturated and only seasonally flooded. Soils are typically a shallow organic muck, although mineral soils could also be present. Beaked sedge, tussock sedge, bladder sedge and bristly sedge are dominant plant types in these meadows.

Cattail Marsh:
Common cattail and/or narrow-leaved cattail dominate these types of marshes. The muck and/or mineral soils found here are typically flooded with shallow standing water throughout the entire year.

Deep Broadleaf Marsh:
Water depth in this type of marsh is typically over one foot year round, although in dry summers, some marshes may have only saturated soils. These types of marshes contain organic type soils, which aid in the growth of broad-leaved arrowhead, pickerelweed and giant bur-reed.

Wild Rice Marsh:
This type of marsh is dominated by wild rice. It has an organic soil substrate that is flooded with one to two feet of water throughout the summer.

Deep Bulrush Marsh:
This type of marsh thrives in open water. Meaning that they are found along the shores of lakes and ponds. Water depths here range from one to six feet. Generally, soft-stem and hard-stem bulrushes dominate this type of marsh.

Importance:
Meadows are important for their water quality protection functions, including the trapping of sediments and transfer of nutrients, as well as stormwater and floodwater retention. They also provide some of the largest "natural" openings found in nature. They form a transition zone between aquatic and upland communities.

Animal Life:
Many species of birds including sandhill cranes, ring-necked pheasants, blackbirds, swamp sparrows, American and least bitterns, common snipes and sedge wrens live within the different meadows. An abundance of mammals such as beavers, muskrats, minks, foxes and many others consider the various meadows home. Reptiles and amphibians that use these communities include common garter snakes, leopard frogs, green frogs and more.
 
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peach107




Joined: 2007-08-18
Posts: 201
Location: prescott, arizona

PostPosted: Thu Aug 30, 2012 3:30 pm Reply with quote Back to top

or this


Ponds:
Both detention and retention ponds aid in the reduction of stormwater runoff and in the improvement of water quality. Although the terms are sometimes used interchangeably, there are great differences between the two.

Retention Ponds:
Retention ponds are designed to "continuously" hold a specific amount of water, indefinately. Because of this fact they are also called "wet ponds". They provide two primary services. First, they capture diverted stormwater runoff from streets, gutters and other impervious surfaces such as parking lots, sidewalks and roofs before releasing it into other bodies of water such as streams or rivers. The captured water is released at flow rates similar to those that existed prior to land clearing and development (natural conditions). The second benefit of a retaining ponds is to provide pollutant removal. Retention ponds have the ability to remove 30 to 80% of certain pollutants before the release into the local watershed. Pollutants commonly reduced include sediments (soil), bacteria, suspended solids, phosphorous, nitrogen, greases, oils, metals, and of course, everyday human trash.

Vegetation:
Aquatic vegetation is often associated with wet ponds. Grasses and plants often establish themselves and serve as extra filters within the wet pond environment. Living vegetation absorbs dissolved pollutants and transforms those pollutants into less toxic materials. Microorganisms also establish themselves and aid in the breakdown of pollutants. Retention ponds are one of the most effective tools in providing channel protection and pollutant removal in an urban stream environment.

Detention Ponds:
Detention ponds are stormwater basins designed to collect a volume of stormwater runoff and "temporarily" hold that water for gradual release into a receiving stream or stormwater sewer system. Most detention ponds are designed to completely empty within a period of less than 24 hours. Being completely dry between events, they are also called "dry ponds". Dry ponds do offer limited settling of particulate matter, but subsequent runoff events can cause a large portion of this material to be resuspended. Therefore, dry ponds are mainly used to reduce the peak discharge of stormwater runoff into streams or stormwater sewers and to help limit downstream flooding. They are not used for pollutant control and/or water quality to the extent that retention ponds are. If water quality treatment is the intended goal of the pond, a wet or extended storage pond design should be considered.

Drainage:
The water levels in both of these pond types is established by the low flow orifice (discharge). Generally the orifice is part of a metal or concrete structure called a riser. A detention pond has an orifice which is level with the bottom of the pond so that all of the water will eventually drains out and it remains dry between runoff events. Retention ponds have a riser with an orifice at a higher point so that it retains a permanent pool of water.

Basically:
The difference between a detention and a retention pond is whether or not it has a permanent pool of water.
 
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